Super Antioxidant Clay Face Mask

I was reading and thinking a little bit about creators and consumers, or rather creators vs. consumers. Seems more appropriate that way. This article is actually about teaching children to code, but it ran right parallel to a video I stumbled upon on Facebook Live with Martha Beck, where she basically outlines the same principles, but with energy. She explains that some of us work to cultivate a "garden" of energy, and then we have a bit of overflow and that's what we give out to others. Just like if you got really good at growing basil from clippings, which I 100% plan to do BTW, and you start giving away little basil plants because you just have so many, and then your friends eat all the basil and come back for more plants. Well, I'd think you were supposed to take that basil, er energy, I gave you and grow it. You weren't supposed to eat it, kill it, and come back for more. So basically this is the premise of "energy vampires." That term has been around forever, Oprah talks about it, so I'm pretty sure most people have heard it, but I didn't really get what it meant until it was put into physical terms. Because gardens, I get gardens, but it not only made perfect sense but also made me think differently about those in my life, and maybe a little about they way I treat others and what I expect, and how much or little I give. It made me see the balance in a new way, I guess is what I am trying to say. Because if you gave me a plant and I killed it. I wouldn't expect a new plant. I'd probably be embarrassed that I couldn't grow my own and try harder next time. I also wouldn't be so mad if someone else needed a new plant, but I would just give them a few tips for growing the second one, but if they didn't seem to have any interest in growing their own, I'd probably just stop giving them plants all together. I should take the same approach to my energy. If a person never shows any intention of growing their own out of what you gave them, it's probably a lost cause. Just something to watch out for.   

The other reason I was thinking about creators and consumers is because I love making things and building things with my hands, and it all seems to be shifting in this direction. That we have this desire to make stuff, and share our strengths instead of just taking and needing more all of the time. I can 100% think of times where I've been the needy one, and luckily I have those who are patient enough in life to keep encouraging me, and then also those who are strong enough to shut me down when what I'm going on about is no longer productive. I don't know, I just got so much out of that ten minutes, hope you did too. Let's all grow our own little gardens, and share the skills we master, and be open to accepting from others what they've mastered. I love it. 

While on my little creator high, I made this face mask, which is highly reminiscent of Glam Glow, an amazing face mask that I once paid nearly $70 for, yup, I believe that might've been at the height of my consumption. It works really well, but I like that now I can create my own. I'm just not going to stop using that word. 

The ingredients in this mask are:

White Tea: White tea is the most beneficial of all of the teas for you skin, being the least processed it maintains the greatest amount of good for your skin. Its benefits include being good for preventing wrinkles, sun damage, and preventing the breakdown of collagen. 

Cucumber Peel: The cucumber peel is actually in my white tea. I'll share a link to it, but if you're feeling crafty you can easily dehydrate your own cucumber peel. This tutorial is for the whole cucumber, but I'll bet you could do the same thing with just the skins. Cucumber reduces inflammation, is hydrating, is good for sensitive and acne prone skin, as well as nourishes and diminishes the darkening for the under-eye area. 

Bentonite Clay: Bentonite clay is known for evening out skin tone, and when used regularly can prevent blackheads. It also softens skin and can help with long term hydration due to its high electrolyte content, found among it's 60 trace minerals. 

Nori: Seaweed firms the skin as well as drawing out excess and trapped moisture that can make your skin look puffy. Like the clay it has a high mineral content, specifically iodine. 

Mint: Since it's anti-inflammatory and cooling, it great for acne, and irritated skin and can lighten acne scarring. Contains a natural source of salicylic acid, which is exfoliating, and leaves skin softer. 

Magnesium: "Magnesium is necessary for the enzymes that regulate DNA replication and repair. Without it, the skin is subject to a host of harmful free radical damage and inflammation." According to The Magnesium Miracle, not only is magnesium good for preventing wrinkles it's critical. 

So this mask is a whole lot milder than the last clay mask I made which had vinegar and charcoal in it. This one is quite a bit gentler and a little bit tingly because of the mint. It's good for balancing oily skin, but also good at adding in minerals to balance skin that needs hydration, because electrolytes and proper mineral balance is essential for hydrated skin. Long term solutions over short term band aids.  

Here's what you'll need:

Keep in mind I made a lot. You can definitely trim the portions and make a smaller batch. I also ran mine through a food processor, totally optional, you can tear it with your hands, but to be fair, mine worked a lot better once fully blended. 

  • 3/4 cup of bentonite clay - I used Redmond Clay, which you can find at Whole Foods 
  • 5-10 springs of mint - I used fresh spearmint, but you can use dried mint as well. 
  • 1/2 of a nori seaweed sheet, cut into strips
  • 3 bags of white tea - I used cucumber mint
  • 1 magnesium tablet - I swear by TwinLabs, but this step is optional since the clay has a fair amount of magnesium already. 


  • Cut open your tea bags and magnesium tablet and mix with the clay. 
  • Cut the nori into smaller strips so that it blends better. 
  • Add all ingredients into a food processor and blend well. 
  • To use: Reconstitute a small amount of clay with water, and put it all over your face and neck. Let it sit for 20-30 minutes, and rinse with warm water. 

P.s. These soaps are from Nature's Skin Nutrition on Etsy, and they're amazing. Those above are super-fat soaps made with rose clay and mango butter, I'm obsessed. 

Balsamic Herb Roasted Garlic

garlic 10.jpg

There are so many different ways to use roasted garlic. My favorite is to take it alone and make a little dip out of it on it's own, but there are so many other ways like pasta, add it to hummus, or add it to mashed potatoes, which actually looks really good right now. I mean they all do, but I only feel an overwhelming need for mashed potatoes. I used it to make soup a few days ago. Apparently you can use it for health reasons too. I haven't done this yet, but I fully intend to. 

Whatever you need it for, it's super simple to make, and you can customize it so many ways. I added in balsamic, basil, and cilantro. I also use vegetable oil instead of olive oil. Olive oil tastes better but I've found it's easier to roast things with vegetable oil. I'm not sure if there's a solid reason for this, but that's been my experience. That being said you can use butter, olive oil, coconut oil, sesame seed oil, or whatever kind of oil you have around. 

Here's what you'll need:

  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 2-3 leaves of basil
  • 2-3 springs of cilantro
  • 1/2 tablespoon of balsamic
  • Enough oil to coat the whole inside of the garlic - I didn't measure. You don't want the oil to pool around the garlic but you do want it to saturate.
  • Salt and pepper - liberally
  • Parchment paper
  • a small tie, twine, yarn, or in this case, paper packaging ribbon. 


  • Set over to 400°
  • Cut a square piece of parchment paper large enough to wrap your garlic in. 
  • Add in all wet ingredients down the center of the garlic. They should sink right in, the balsamic will change the color of the garlic once it's absorbed.
  • Liberally top with salt and pepper. 
  • Add in herbs and tie up the parchment paper. 
  • Place on a lower rack inside an over safe dish. Move the racks around if you need to, to make sure that the paper isn't touching anything inside the oven. 
  • Bake for 35-40 minutes or until golden brown on the inside. The cloves will get very soft and spreadable when they're done. 
  • Cut off the tie and serve and it's ready to use. Keeps for 2 weeks, three weeks at the very outside, store in the fridge.